FAMILY FALLOUT SHELTER

Scenarios, Disaster Planning

FAMILY FALLOUT SHELTER

Postby kmussack » 11 Aug 2017 12:33

I grew up during the Cold War and there were times when I didn’t think I would get to grow up. I have vivid memories of those days leading up to Halloween 1962. (We had regular “Duck and Cover” drills in my elementary school.)

Before I was in my teens I was thinking about what it would take to survive “nuclear combat toe to toe with the Roosskies.” (To quote Major T.J. “King” Kong played by Slim Pickens in Dr. Strangelove.)

I received my first formal Radiological Defense (RADEF) training as a teenager in 1967 while a Civil Air Patrol Cadet. In addition to learning about nuclear weapons effects and the nature of radioactive fallout, we learned how to use hand held and airborne radiation survey meters and dosimeters. We used to play a kind of hide and seek with actual radioactive sources and Geiger counters. (Not something that would be allowed today I’m sure.)

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Throughout high school and college I cultivated my keen interest in all things related to survival, ranging from wilderness survival skills to the more apocalyptic.

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Entering the U.S. Army in the mid 70’s I was trained in the usual NBC/CBR defensive TTPs in BCT & AIT. (How’s that for a sentence full of TLAs? TLA = Three Letter Acronym)

After OCS I attended Infantry Officer Basic Course where we learned a little about Bugs ‘n Gas ‘n Nukes. One of my “additional duties” as a newly minted 2LT was “NBC Officer” for our infantry company. For this job I attended a five-day division level school.

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That pretty much sums up my CV of formal training on the subject of Radiological Defense (RADEF).

I have spent the past several decades learning more about RADEF, collecting RADEF equipment and making physical preparations necessary to survive the effects of nuclear war, primarily radioactive fallout.

The fall of the Soviet Union, the signing of various arms reduction treaties and the scaling back of our strategic nuclear forces did nothing to convince me that nuclear war was any less likely today than it was in 1962. This whole North Korea mess supports my position.

When it came time to build our house I knew that anyone who overtly declares their intent to build a “fallout shelter” will be immediately declared a certifiable Moon Bat and will be ostracized and ridiculed.

So a pretext was used. I explained to my contractor that the 12’ wide X 48’ long X 7’ high room in the basement was to be used as an indoor range. The 8” thick steel reinforced concrete ceiling, the Maze Entrance, the 12” thick interior sand filled block wall and the ventilation tunnels were designed to attenuate noise and provide ballistic protection. It was all very plausible.

I added, “Pssst, keep this under your hat I don’t want people thinking I’m crazy for wanting to shoot in my basement. Besides I’m not entirely sure an indoor range is even legal.”

I got a wink and a nod from the contractor along with, “I’m a shooter too, and I think this is cool. By the way, this would make a pretty good bomb shelter too.”

I replied, “Don’t be crazy. Who needs a bomb shelter?”

So no further explanation was required and the passing of three decades has pretty much erased any memories of the details of those who may have witnessed the construction.

Having a shelter, a good shelter, a large shelter ready and waiting in the event that the unthinkable were to happen was on top of my A-List. I checked that off a long time ago.
“The modern world demands that we approve what it should not even dare ask us to tolerate.” Nicolas Gomez Davila
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Re: FAMILY FALLOUT SHELTER

Postby kmussack » 11 Aug 2017 13:04

One more thing….

Securing a shelter space is an important first step in mounting a meaningful Radiological Defense (RADEF).

But that’s only the beginning, in addition to a shelter space you’ll need knowledge and equipment related to RADEF. Educate and equip yourself to defend yourself and your family from radioactive threats.

You must develop the skill set and the inventory of gear necessary to decide for yourself when you must take shelter and when it is safe to leave the shelter.

You simply cannot rely on “the authorities” for advice in this matter. They will not be where you are. They might be inept. They might lie. They might not exist.

PJF is fond of saying, “It’s never too late to begin preparing.”

In this case, let's hope he's right.
“The modern world demands that we approve what it should not even dare ask us to tolerate.” Nicolas Gomez Davila
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Re: FAMILY FALLOUT SHELTER

Postby Ekiwinox » 11 Aug 2017 22:12

Civil Air Patrol Cadet is the organization is I think the group I was thinking about but could not remember to name when I was in the last day or two talking about good clubs or groups for youth to join. Other family members have sons in this group and the adults volunteer their time. The young people in these types of groups seem defined by the fact that they seem very comfortable talking about technical topics with adults. It seems to have shaped their young men. It would seem to be a great place for youth as evidenced by kmussack. Note. It matters not the group but the same skills are increased by old fashioned 4-H or CAP. There is also lots of adult mentoring. More replies as I read your other posts.
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